There's another scam circulating in the Quad Cities and this one hits us all in a vulnerable spot.

The University of Iowa Health Care issued a news release warning the community of a phone scam. The callers say they're phoning on behalf of UIHC to schedule appointments to be vaccinated for COVID-19 but ask for social security and credit card numbers.

The release states the following:

"The public should be aware that UI Health Care will never ask for this information to schedule a vaccination. If individuals receive this call, they should hang up immediately."

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The Iowa City Press Citizen reminds us that at the end of last year, Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller warned Iowans about potential stimulus and COVID-19 vaccine scams.

According to the IowaAttorneyGeneral.gov site,

“Scammers follow the headlines, and they’ll take advantage of our excitement, confusion, and other emotions,” Miller said.   

Here's another related scam.

Aging Resources of Central Iowa reported that a scammer was contacting Iowans offering “to sell a ticket of some kind to you or an older adult guaranteeing a place on a waiting list for the COVID-19 vaccine.”

The FBI warns about similar scams, as well as other “potential indicators of fraudulent activity”:

  • offers to undergo additional medical testing or procedures when obtaining a vaccine;
  • marketers offering to sell and/or ship doses of a vaccine, domestically or internationally, in exchange for payment of a deposit or fee;
  • unsolicited emails, telephone calls, or personal contact from someone claiming to be from a medical office, insurance company, or COVID-19 vaccine center requesting personal and/or medical information to determine recipients’ eligibility to participate in clinical vaccine trials or obtain the vaccine;
  • claims of FDA approval for a vaccine that cannot be verified
  • advertisements for vaccines through social media platforms, email, telephone calls, online, or from unsolicited/unknown sources;
  • individuals contacting you in person, by phone, or by email to tell you the government or government officials require you to receive a COVID-19 vaccine.

In addition, beware of companies offering products, treatments, or medicines to prevent the virus. Check with your health care provider before paying for or receiving any COVID-19-related treatment.

It takes some pretty sick people to prey on anyone but especially something like this. Don't get scammed.

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