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Connor Kenney

It's been over a week since the Derecho impacted majority of Iowa and Illinois. Towns and cities from Des Moines to Dixon, IL were impacted by this storm. One of the harder hit areas along the path of the Derecho was Clinton.

After the Derecho passed, I went up there to check on family and friends (because I'm from there) and my goodness it was not pretty. While we saw what it did to the Quad Cities, Clinton got hit hard.

Debris everywhere, power lines down, streets blocked and so much more. My brother and sister just got their power back on yesterday. With Clinton being highly impacted from the Derecho and a lot more debris had fallen, Clinton County Emergency Management officials are taking precautionary measurements to keep residents in the county safe from possibly more falling debris.

In a press release on Monday, officials from the Clinton County Emergency Management said that they will be sounding the outdoor warning sirens for every severe storm that will impact Clinton County. In the press release, Chance Kness, the Clinton County Emergency Management Coordinator, said:

"We are changing the police through the end of August due to the increased danger posed by loose tree debris, debris on power lines and unstable trees. Any severe thunderstorms carries the chance of wind and heavy rain that could cause that debris to fall."

Normally policy for sounding the outdoor warning sirens during a severe thunderstorm is that the storm must have a potential for winds of 70 mph or more.