The weather in the Quad Cities has been hot, dry, and quiet this year. Tonight, that could all change. The National Weather Service (NWS) of the Quad Cities is predicting that severe thunderstorms could pop up this evening and in the overnight bringing damaging winds, possible hail, localized flooding, and possibly isolated tornados.

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Things could get a little intense tonight in the skies. According to the NWS of the Quad Cities, later this evening and overnight, a complex of thunderstorms is expected to move across portions of eastern Iowa and northwest Illinois.

But before we get to these severe thunderstorms, it's going to be quite a hot and steamy June day once again. The NWS of the Quad Cities says that temperatures are expected to get to the mid to even upper 90's across portions of eastern Iowa this afternoon.

Combined with increasing humidity, these factors will lead to heat index readings over 100° during the afternoon and early evening. Yeah, definitely going to be hot and steamy.

A Heat Advisory has been issued for a good portion of Iowa including Linn and Johnson counties.

The rain tonight will definitely help a little too. Currently, some counties in the Quad Cities area are seeing abnormally dry drought conditions. Most of Iowa is seeing a lot more dryer conditions than Illinois. You can see more drought data here.

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Now back to those severe storms that are possible tonight.

After a hot and muggy day, the NWS of the Quad Cities says there is a good chance that these evening and overnight storms will be severe and bring with them damaging winds and large hail, which are the primary threats.

An isolated tornado is possible mainly north of Highway 30. Very heavy rain is also possible, which could result in localized flooding.

The highest risk of these severe storms popping up will be between 6 p.m. and overnight.

Right now, the chance of severe thunderstorms is slight. But according to the NWS of Des Moines, there is more of an enhanced risk of these storms in northeastern Iowa and into portions of southwestern Wisconsin and northwestern Illinois.

As of Thursday morning, this is the current forecast through Sunday night according to the NWS of the Quad Cities:

  • Today
    • Scattered showers and thunderstorms, mainly before 10 am.
    • Mostly sunny, with a high near 92.
    • South wind 10 to 15 mph, with gusts as high as 20 mph.
    • Chance of precipitation is 40%.
  • Tonight
    • Showers and thunderstorms likely, mainly after 5 am.
    • Mostly cloudy, with a low around 73.
    • South wind 10 to 15 mph.
    • Chance of precipitation is 60%.
    • New rainfall amounts between a quarter and half of an inch possible.
  • Friday
    • A chance of showers and thunderstorms before 1 pm, then a slight chance of showers and thunderstorms after 4 pm.
    • Mostly sunny, with a high near 92.
    • West wind 5 to 10 mph becoming northwest in the morning.
    • Chance of precipitation is 30%.
  • Friday Night
    • A 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly after 7 pm.
    • Partly cloudy, with a low around 68.
    • West wind around 5 mph becoming calm.
  • Saturday
    • Sunny, with a high near 90.
  • Saturday Night
    • A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms after 1 am.
    • Partly cloudy, with a low around 68.
  • Sunday
    • Showers and thunderstorms likely, mainly after 1 pm.
    • Partly sunny, with a high near 89.
    • Chance of precipitation is 60%.
  • Sunday Night
    • Showers and thunderstorms likely, mainly before 1 am.
    • Mostly cloudy, with a low around 66.
    • Chance of precipitation is 70%.

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